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Monday, August 3, 2020 | History

4 edition of Source and Meaning in Spenser"s Allegory found in the catalog.

Source and Meaning in Spenser"s Allegory

John Erskine Hankins

Source and Meaning in Spenser"s Allegory

A Study of The Faerie Queene

by John Erskine Hankins

  • 400 Want to read
  • 27 Currently reading

Published by Oxford University Press, USA .
Written in English


The Physical Object
Number of Pages348
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL7396317M
ISBN 100198120133
ISBN 109780198120131

Christopher Burlinson's Allegory, Space and the Material World in the Writings of Edmund Spenser contributes to the growing field sometimes called the "new materialism," sometimes the already aging "new new historicism," while also engaging the old "history of ideas" (though he might not call it that) associated with allegory. As Burlinson puts it, "This book as a whole . A literary criticism of Edmund Spenser's unfinished epic poem "The Faerie Queene" is presented. It examines the general intention or meaning of the allegory as explained by the author to his friend, author Sir Walter Raleigh. It also discusses shifts in the moral allegory according to the different Books of the epic.

The book Animal Farm is a classic example of allegory. The characters in the book are intended to parallel real people from the Russian communist revolution . Source and Meaning in Spenser's Allegory by Hankins, John and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at

  His book, Spenser’s Images of Life is a compilation of lectures notes, put together by Alastair Fowler, to give students a deeper insight into The Faerie Queene. I’m not going to even pretend that I understood half of what Lewis was saying in these lectures/notes, but my lack of understanding emphasizes one of the many things that I respect. In his book-length study on Spenser’s allegorical rhetoric, Michael Murrin sets out the difficult ways in which rhetoric and allegory intersect throughout much Renaissance thought. For Murrin, ‘the allegorical poet’ was frequently ‘asked to perform the function of orator’; delivering clarity of meaning within the genre of allegory.


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Source and Meaning in Spenser"s Allegory by John Erskine Hankins Download PDF EPUB FB2

Source and Meaning in Spenser's Allegory: A Study of The Faerie Queene [Hankins, John Erskine] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Source and Meaning in Spenser's Allegory: A Study of The Faerie QueeneCited by: Get this from a library.

Source and meaning in Spenser's allegory: a study of The faerie queene. [John Erskine Hankins]. Genre/Form: Allegory Allegories Criticism, interpretation, etc Sources: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Hankins, John Erskine, Source and meaning in Spenser's allegory.

allegory meaning: 1. a story, play, poem, picture, or other work in which the characters and events represent.

Learn more. To remain “lit” each lantern lamp must tap into the universal Source of energy. If the link is weak, depression and-or illness sets in.

If the link is strong, life persists. This metaphor to me best illustrates the universe.” ― Vera Nazarian, The Perpetual Calendar of Inspiration.

Stanford Libraries' official online search tool for books, media, journals, databases, government documents and more. As a literary device, an allegory is a narrative, whether in prose or verse, in which a character, place or event is used to deliver a broader message about real-world issues and occurrences.

Allegory (in the sense of the practice and use of allegorical devices and works) has occurred widely throughout history in all forms of art, largely because it can readily illustrate or convey.

The allegorical meaning of Spenser's Muiopotmos [Lucy Edwards] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying : Lucy Edwards. Mount Everest (9) You might be skeptical that a poem about knights Source and Meaning in Spensers Allegory book shining armor and damsels in distress could really be that tricky, but Spenser's The Faerie Queene is up to a whole lot more than just some good old story-telling.

Spenser intentionally wrote The Faerie Queene in archaic, out-of-date language, meaning that reading Spenser was strange even for someone from his. The Book: Life of Pi, a book about a kid who grew up in a zoo and ends up getting trapped on a boat with a tiger in the middle of the ocean.

#whimsy. The Author: Yann Martel, who sums up the meaning of Life of Pi like so: “Life is a story You can choose your story A story with God is the better story.”.

Allegory may involve an interpretive process that is separate from the creative process; that is, the term allegory can refer to a specific method of reading a text, in which characters and narrative or descriptive details are taken by the reader as an elaborate metaphor for something outside the literal story.

For example, the early Church Fathers sometimes used a threefold (later fourfold. An allegory is the rhetorical strategy of extending a metaphor through an entire narrative. Thus, it's a longer description, illustration, analogy, or comparison than a simile or a metaphor would be.

In an allegory, any objects, persons, and actions in the text are a part of that large metaphor and equate to meanings that lie outside the : Richard Nordquist. What does allegory add to this poem and how is reading it different from reading non-allegorical poems or stories.

One of the challenges of reading and interpreting The Faerie Queene is its lack of overall narrative unification: each book tends to be primarily a stand-alone narrative with only tangential connections to the books that surround it.

Description. The Faerie Queene () is an epic poem by Edmund Spenser (c. –), which follows the adventures of a number of medieval knights. The poem, written in a deliberately archaic style, draws on history and myth, particularly the legends of Arthur. Each book follows the adventures of a knight who represents a particular virtue (holiness, temperance, chastity.

The Faerie Queene is an English epic poem by Edmund I–III were first published inand then republished in together with books IV–VI. The Faerie Queene is notable for its form: it is one of the longest poems in the English language as well as the work in which Spenser invented the verse form known as the Spenserian stanza.

Author: Edmund Spenser. As an allegory, the characters, places, objects, and actions carry meaning on a variety of levels. Some say that Spenser designed seven levels of meaning into The Faerie Queene. Meaning is certainly found on religious, moral, philosophical, political, social, and literal levels.

Each book of the series is divided into cantos (chapters); each File Size: 65KB. A method of interpretation or exposition where the words contain a secondary meaning, other than the straightforward one. John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress is an allegory. In the OT, Isa. has an allegory of the vine.

An allegory is a term for a figure of speech. It is a story or picture with a hidden meaning. The characters in allegories are symbols which represent particular ideas.

The story has a figurative meaning, not just a literal one. Allegory is an example of rhetoric, but an allegory does not have to be a story in may be something to look at, such as a painting or sculpture.

Allegory definition is - the expression by means of symbolic fictional figures and actions of truths or generalizations about human existence; also: an instance (as in a story or painting) of such expression.

How to use allegory in a sentence. What is allegory. Allegory. Definition: Allegory is a form of extended metaphor in which objects and persons within a narrative are equated with meanings that lie outside the narrative.

Allegory implies two levels of meaning -- the literal (what happens in the narrative) and the symbolic (what the events stand for, outside the narrative). It evokes a dual. “ On this material plane, each living being is like a street lantern lamp with a dirty lampshade. The inside flame burns evenly and is of the same quality as all the resthence all of us are equal in the absolute sense, the essence, in the quality of our energy.

But Spenser’s deeper psychological insight, A. C. Hamilton suggests in The Nature of Spenser’s Allegory, is that allegory read critically—‘as a complicated puzzle concealing riddles which confuse the reader’ (p.

43)—defeats its intent. ‘Working’ allegory is rather an epiphenomenon of engagement with the fiction on a literal. "The importance of Dunseath's study is that it proposes an original interpretation of the allegory of The Faerie Queene, Book V, and a fresh theory of its poetic function It brings new material into play, and offers a sensible, integrated reading of many of the poem's most important passages, so that it may well prove a pace-setter for this kind of Spenserian study."--Alastair Pages: